Wednesday, November 9, 2011

Angel Oak Tree

What a great day, the weather was beautiful. We went on a field trip to see this amazing and beautiful tree. Standing under it is so amazing to look all around it and be in awe the strength it has. It's gone through a hurricane and still stands. Below is a picture and some history on it. Enjoy the beauty.

Angel Oak is a live oak. It is native to the low country and is not very tall but has a wide spread canopy. Lumber from the live oak forests in the sea islands was highly valued for shipbuilding in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Angel Oak stands on part of Abraham Waight's 1717 land grant. Mr. Waight owned several plantations.

Recorded history traces the ownership of the live oak and surrounding land, back to the year 1717 when Abraham Waight received it as part of a small land grant. The tree stayed in the Waight family for four generations, and was part of a Marriage Settlement to Justus Angel and Martha Waight Tucker Angel. In modern times, the Angel Oak has become the focal point of a public park. Today the live oak has a diameter of spread reaching 160 feet, a circumference of nearly 25 feet, and covers 17,100 square feet of ground.

The Angel Oak is thought to be one of the oldest living things east of the Mississippi River. Acorns from the Angel Oak have grown to produce authentic direct-offspring trees.. Live oaks generally grow out and not up, but the Angel Oak has had plenty of time to do both, standing 65 ft high and with a canopy providing 17,000 square feet of shade. Its limbs, the size of tree trunks themselves, are so large and heavy that some of them rest on the ground (some even drop underground for a few feet and then come back up), a feature common to only the very oldest live oaks. It has survived countless hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, and human interference, so there's a good chance it will still be there waiting for you.

All these pictures below were taken by our son. He's got a great eye.



We've never seen white squirrels and they had two, awesome!






12 comments:

kathi17 said...

I wish I had been there with you, I love looking at beautiful natural things too, and understand the awe you most have felt under that tree. I would also have loved to see those white squirrels, they look so cute! I'm so glad you put that on your blog!

Jonia said...

Wow Cassandra, your son does have a great eye and I love the photos he got of the squirell. Beautiful photos and some good history!

Jennifer @ Studio JRU said...

Oh wow... that is so neat! What an amazing tree. And I love the white squirrels! I have never seen a white one before. We only have brown, but some of our family have black ones!

Shelley said...

That is so cool Cassandra! Where is it located? And I've never seen white squirrels before....too neat!

Shelley
http://carleys-closet.blogspot.com
shelleymace21@gmail.com

MaxineD said...

Thank you for sharing Cassandra - it's a fascinating tree and great to know it's history and dimensions.
The photographs are amazing - you son really has a great eye for dimension and perspective.
Blessings
Maxine

Coleen said...

I have never seen a white squirrel either. My husband wondered if he was an albino.

Following now Cassandra. I hope you'll follow on my blog too as that helps me remember to come back here to visit.

Blessings, Coleen in Ukraine
www.vintageterrace2.blogspot.com

RORO LEE said...

Cool tree!! And this is my first time see a white squirrel too! Thanks to share all these amazing pictures!

MiamiKel said...

How beautiful! What a wonderful history lesson - that is one gorgeous gift of nature, both the tree and the little squirrels. So unique! TFS!

Becky said...

what gorgeous photos. I have never seen a white squirrel before.

Lovey said...

Indeed he does...these are beautiful....

Ina said...

More beautiful photos. That tree is awsome and love all the different images your son took. I especially loved the squirrel.

Ina said...

I had left a comment but it disappeared. Lovely photos and that squirrel is just gorgeous.I didn't know there were white squirrels. Thanks for sharing again.